FAIRYTALES WITH BITE AND THIS WORLD AND OTHERS

FAIRYTALES WITH BITE and THIS WORLD AND OTHERS

Just to say I’ve needed to schedule posts to appear on both of my websites and my Facebook page for a day or so.  Back to normal on Sunday evening!  Have a fabulous weekend.  Have put up the links to the Blog page on my websites so you should get to see the latest post as each one appears (I hope!).

http://fairytaleswithbite.weebly.com/blog—kingdom-life

http://allisonsymes-thisworldandothers.weebly.com/blog—creating-worlds

 

A classic book doesn't necessarily have to be old. Image via Pixabay

MIRACLES TAKE A LITTLE LONGER…

FAIRYTALES WITH BITE

Miracles Take a Little Longer discusses simple miracles (two rival species ending that rivalry) and more complicated ones (a dictatorship becomes a democracy for example).  What would count as a miracle in your fictional world?  What are the chances of it happening and would it be welcomed even if it did?

THIS WORLD AND OTHERS

Missing Information discusses what data could be deliberately withheld from your characters and the impact on them when they realise they have been kept in the dark.  The missing information has to be crucial to your characters (both to those withholding it and those who need it) so what would motivate them here?

CHANDLER’S FORD TODAY

I love discussing books on CFT as these posts usually generate comments and a good online discussion takes place.  I discuss Classic Books this week and ask what makes a classic book and lists my Top 10.

FACEBOOK PAGE

Unsurprisingly perhaps, I discuss my CFT post here tonight.

 

feature-image-classic-books

My Chandler’s Ford Today post for this week.  Image via Pixabay

 

 

The classic beginning for all stories... Image via Pixabay

WHAT EVERY FAIRY GODMOTHER NEEDS IN HER ARMOURY

FAIRYTALES WITH BITE

What Every Fairy Godmother needs in her Armoury lists five things or attributes I think the average fairy godmother would definitely need to be able to carry out her role efficiently.  Do you agree with my list?

THIS WORLD AND OTHERS

In How Characters Relate, I discuss this and ask about those characters who can’t or won’t relate to others.  Are they psychopathic?  How do other characters relate to them?  Where this isn’t an issue, how do characters react when their prejudices are shown up to be wrong?

FACEBOOK PAGE

I ask what is your favourite book theme tonight.  One of my favourites is that of injustices being put right (I suppose I like this because they so often aren’t put right in life).  I also share some of my favourite stories on this topic.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FAllison.Symes.FairytaleLady%2Fposts%2F875896545846659&width=500

Fairytale heroines. Image via Pixabay.

A  useful working knowledge of what you can do with pumpkins could be helpful to your average fairy godmother.  Image via Pixabay.

The world of the imagination should play a role in your stories. I can't imagine any world without some form of the arts. Image via Pixabay.

THE POINT OF CHANGE

FAIRYTALES WITH BITE

The Point of Change talks about that pivotal moment when the story is “on”.  It is at that point your main character realises their life is going to change and they either can’t fight this further or accept that the need for change is there and “go with it”.  So how do they handle it?  Do they have help?  Is your point of change strong enough to be the story (because effectively that is the story.  Something happens to Character A and the ramifications are X, Y and Z, but without that something, there is no story).

THIS WORLD AND OTHERS

Character Spotting refers to spotting those characters whose story is worth telling (who are literally strong enough to carry the tale) and to picking up on those attributes/attitudes the character has, which will confirm they are strong enough to carry said story.  I list three major qualities I look for in a character which confirm to me this character is the one to write about/for.

FACEBOOK PAGE

I talk about how music conveys mood and how writers must do this by carefully selecting which words they use.  Obvious perhaps but this is also where double meanings are so useful for a writer.  They can convey so much without upsetting your word count limitations!

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FAllison.Symes.FairytaleLady%2Fposts%2F875216725914641&width=500

I write fairytales with bite as flash fiction and short stories in particular. Image via Pixabay.

Your characters step out of the page and seem real to your reader when the point of change for them is strong enough to keep your reader wanting to know what happens next. Image via Pixabay.

 

Images from the magical world... Image via Pixabay

THEMES

FAIRYTALES WITH BITE

One thing I love about fairytales (and fantasy in general) is that the themes the stories tackle are themes I adore.  For example, justice will happen eventually and monsters will be defeated.  I list five themes in Themes that particularly appeal to me.

THIS WORLD AND OTHERS

Keep on Keeping On was one of my late mother’s favourite phrases and it emphasizes the need for persistence and not to give up easily.  That is vital for us as writers if we are not to be knocked back by rejections.  It is also crucial for our characters to be able to show real grit and persistence.

FACEBOOK PAGE

I discuss what I like most All You Need to Know about Classical Music and why it is important writers are thoroughly nosey!

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FAllison.Symes.FairytaleLady%2Fposts%2F874553382647642&width=500

The ultimate book circle perhaps? Image via Pixabay.

The ultimate book circle perhaps?  Certainly enough stories to start with! Image via Pixabay.

The magic of stories. Image via Pixabay

BOOKS FOR THE MAGICAL WORLD

FAIRYTALES WITH BITE

In Books for the Magical World, I suggest what volumes would be likely to appear on people’s bookshelves.  I’ve excluded standard spell and charm books and the classic fairytales but have included things like Wand Size – Does it Matter? (one for the more insecure wizard I think) to Voice Coaching – How to Perfect that Cackle for the beginner fairytale witch who wants to get her “sound” right.

THIS WORLD AND OTHERS

How Important is Reading is one of those questions that have inspired reports, essays, academic papers and so on, so how can I answer it in a blog post?  By focusing on answering it from your characters’ viewpoint.  Do they read and, if so, what?  Do they try to read the books their society bans and so on?

FACEBOOK PAGE

I discuss book and story formats tonight.  This follows on from my recent Chandler’s Ford Today post about the Blood and Valour comic book/graphic novel.  I like this kind of thing as these are splendid artworks in their own right and I feel an invaluable aid to coaxing in the reluctant reader.  I also discuss audio books.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FAllison.Symes.FairytaleLady%2Fposts%2F873855466050767&width=500

Main Cover - Blood and Valour. Image supplied by Eastleigh Borough Council.

Main Cover – Blood and Valour. Image supplied by Eastleigh Borough Council.  Glorious artwork and a great way of bringing in reluctant readers.

 

 

Says it all really and ties in with my post tonight for This World and Others. Image via Pixabay.

THE JOY OF BOOKS

It’s spot the theme night tonight!

FAIRYTALES WITH BITE

The Joy of Books looks at well the joy of books for one thing but also asks whether your characters read for pleasure.  Also, do your characters take in their stories via print or do they use other media to do so? How do your characters “use” their literacy?

THIS WORLD AND OTHERS

In Reading, ask how literate is your world and if reading is encouraged or viewed with suspicion?  (Reading can generate ideas, after all, some of which at least could be threatening to those in power).  Are there libraries?  Can anyone access them?

FACEBOOK PAGE

I talk about the various books I have on my Kindle – everything from C.S. Lewis to Doctor Who to short stories to fantasy to history (fact and fiction).  I conclude by wondering if someone found my Kindle, would they consider me a confused reader or someone who couldn’t make up their mind as to what they read?  For me, variety is the spice of my reading life.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FAllison.Symes.FairytaleLady%2Fposts%2F873141469455500&width=500

The Kindle - modern reading for a modern era. Image via Pixabay.

The Kindle – modern reading for a modern era. Image via Pixabay.

Main Cover - Blood and Valour. Image supplied by Eastleigh Borough Council.

LEGENDS AND MYTHS

FAIRYTALES WITH BITE

My posts tonight revolve around my Chandler’s Ford Today post for this week, which is about the latest Road to Agincourt Project on Sir Bevis of Hampton, Southampton’s legendary mascot.  More on that further down.  But for Fairytales With Bite, I take the idea of legends and myths and look at how these should come into your fiction, especially if your stories involve any kind of world building.  My Legends and Myths post discusses why a fictional world needs its own legends and myths to make it seem more real and give good reasons for inspiring your characters’ actions.

THIS WORLD AND OTHERS

Words and Pictures again shares a link to my CFT post but also looks at how prose/poetry writers should still be seeking to conjure up strong images in our readers so they will want to keep on reading to the end of our story/book.  That is the writer’s challenge, whether we write graphic novels/comic books or straight prose/poetry.

CHANDLER’S FORD TODAY

One of the things I love about writing for CFT is the fact I’ve been able to write about two of my great loves – books and history – on a regular basis.  Tonight’s post, Introducing Guy Stauber – Marvel at Sir Bevis Comic combines both and shares news of Blood and Valour, a graphic novel/comic book due out in the spring, about the adventures of Sir Bevis of Hampton.

Blood and Valour is part of the Road to Agincourt Project.  I’ve written several posts connected with them over the last year or so (and have always learned something interesting from them.  For instance, until recently, I didn’t know there was the wreckage of a medieval ship in a local river – and part of this is visible at times from the motorway which runs nearby).

Sir Bevis’s adventures first appeared in tapestries and it is known Henry V read them this way (hence the link to Agincourt).  Now the tales are being given a very modern airing in graphic novel form.

Guy Stauber, who has worked with Marvel, Disney and DC Comics, is producing some of the artwork for this project and the post talks about that and shares some of his stunning images.  Matt Beames is writing Blood and Valour and it is also illustrated by Marcus Pullen but to have Guy on board for this project is a real coup for them.  I’m looking forward to seeing the comic when it comes out as I’m a huge fan of anything that encourages reluctant readers to get “into” books. I believe that graphic fiction is and can be a great contributor there.

FACEBOOK PAGE

All about my CFT post tonight with links and images.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FAllison.Symes.FairytaleLady%2Fposts%2F872373896198924&width=500

Tonight's CFT post shares some of Guy's stunning artwork for the Sir Bevis of Hampton comic, written by Matt Beames and also illustrated by Marcus Pullen. Image supplied by Eastleigh Borough Council.

Tonight’s CFT post shares some of Guy’s stunning artwork for the Sir Bevis of Hampton comic, written by Matt Beames and also illustrated by Marcus Pullen. Image supplied by Eastleigh Borough Council.

 

Tapestries told stories - the Sir Bevis of Hampton legends just being part of this. Image via Pixabay.

WHILE IN THE MAGICAL WORLD…

FAIRYTALES WITH BITE

While in the Magical World, Don’t Forget gives five tips for what you should bear in mind if you ever find yourself visiting a magical universe.  Could be a life saver this…

THIS WORLD AND OTHERS

Five Top Tips shares some pointers I’ve found useful in creating characters especially.  For example, studying human nature gives a wonderful look into motivations for different groups of people (why do criminals act the way they do is just one example of this).  You can then, of course, apply those motivations to your characters, knowing they are rooted in reality.

FACEBOOK PAGE/CHANDLER’S FORD TODAY

I give a preview of what is coming up in my Chandler’s Ford Today post due to appear tomorrow (Friday 13th – am not superstitious!).  My post will be another article in the Road to Agincourt series and looks at a forthcoming graphic novel called Blood and Valour.  A very special illustrator is involved in this (has worked for Marvel and Disney no less!) and the novel is about local (Southampton, UK) legend, Sir Bevis of Hampton.  More tomorrow.  Will say the Agincourt posts are huge fun to write as I love history and I always learn something as I research them.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FAllison.Symes.FairytaleLady%2Fposts%2F871688139600833&width=500

The old way of writing a story! Image via Pixabay

Sir Bevis’s story used to be told in tapestries, now there will be a graphic novel about him!  Image via Pixabay

One of the best ways to escape is with a good book. Image via Pixabay.

WHAT WOULD YOU ASK YOUR CHARACTERS?

FAIRYTALES WITH BITE

What Would You Ask Your Characters if you Could is a good exercise.  Putting your characters through their paces so to speak helps you to know them really well and so you should then write (for/about) them more convincingly.  I share three questions that could be useful for you to ask your “people”.

THIS WORLD AND OTHERS

When Push Comes to Shove continues the theme of knowing your characters well enough to write (for/about) them convincingly.  And putting your characters through hell is a good way to find out what they are really well enough and whether they are strong enough to be in your story.  A weak character still has the potential to be in your story just as long as they are crucial to the plot.

FACEBOOK PAGE

I discuss the snow that’s due tomorrow, how it will make for a good evening in for reading, and how weather can be used as a character in itself in fiction.  I don’t do this myself but the best example is in The Lord of the Rings I think.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fallison.symes.50%2Fposts%2F10154939378312053&width=500

 

Two formats for reading and Chandler's Ford library stocks both. Image via Pixabay.

A cold night = more reading perhaps.  Image via Pixabay.